Trinity announces major gift to create space for worship and artistic expression


“Young Christians today care about spoken and written ideas, but they increasingly resonate with expression of faith through art, symbol and sound,” said the Rev Erik Samuelson, campus pastor.

Trinity Lutheran College has received a pledge for the third-largest gift in its 67-year history. George and Jackie Brammer, farmers and residents of north central Idaho, will contribute $700,000 to a two-year project that will ultimately redevelop the Campus Center’s top floor into a center for worship and art.

The chapel will be named for George’s parents, the late Otto and Goldia Brammer, who exemplified lives of service to the church and its outreach. The college renovated its Campus Center in 2008, but left the fifth floor open to potential tenants. Recent enrollment growth has made the extra space important for the college’s educational and community activities.

The gift follows a strategic planning process led by Trinity’s new president, John Reed, that emphasizes the importance of helping students develop skills in both digital technology and spiritual formation. “I’m thrilled that the Brammer name is connected to this initiative, since their story serves as a model for our students,” Reed said. “Here are two people who have been successful in life and remain deeply committed to the spiritual and vocational development of students who will be leaders for future generations.” President Reed said he continues to be actively cultivating resources for additional initiatives outlined in the strategic plan.

The project will serve as a tangible expression of Trinity’s interest in modeling ways of integrating visual art, music, and worship. The chapel design will have worship space at its center, extending out into areas for student creativity, whether through composition, painting, or graphic design.

“Young Christians today care about spoken and written ideas, but they increasingly resonate with expression of faith through art, symbol and sound,” said the Rev Erik Samuelson, campus pastor. “It is great to be a part of a college that can use its small size and commitment to innovation to make a big difference in the way we think of worship and art as a community.”